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20121112
20121120
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded on the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestantism. by the 20th century, catholics and jews mayed an important role, the -- played an important role, even the progressives emerged from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, common law, which which posits that god has given or that law is given from god to the people, and it bubbles upward to the rulers. this gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common law stands in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common law, but by the 20th century, both had nonetheless abandoned it. therefor, by the end of world war or ii when -- world war ii when europe unloaded its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. thus, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant rel
to destroy them. what are the four pillars? first, america was founded in the christian religion and predominantly influenced by protestant. by the 20th century catholic, jewish but important role a culture 190000 so fundamentally protestant and even the progressives emerged from the liberal protestant churches. this reinforced the second exceptional pillar, ma, which causes the last given from god to defeat all in bubbles upward to the rulers. kids says the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to peer, my stands in stark opposition to every other nation on earth that is develop some form of civil law and which the law. germany and england had come them off for a while but by the 20 century, both have more or less abandoned it, germany more so than england. their further the end of world war ii, when europe unloaded, however unwillingly its colony, those colonies themselves to find and print process of the law. thus the first of pillars taken together means that a christian, protestant religion influence and shape everything about ameri
will crest in the next few hours. >> back to iran now where religion dictates politics and social behavior and the district i of an islamic state. >> a new exhibition opening today shows how ordinary citizens to find ways to express themselves in their everyday lives. >> the german photographer fines even a family picnic can be its own small act of defiance. >> at first glance, the scenes look mundane -- two sisters traditionally dressed, a couple in the mountains outside tehran, two young women at a highway rest stop. >> the image we receive of iran -- i just wanted to check it out for myself in my own subjective way. >> she spent three weeks traveling through iran in september, using her camera lens to determine how much a daily life is -- how much daily life is affected by their oppressive rule. her photographs captured iranians enjoying a picnic, a hugely popular activity in the country. under closer inspection, the pictures reveal the many ways in which people subvert the rule -- young women burial -- barely covering their hair, a young married couple drinking in college together, two
for organized religion in church property and land was expropriated wholesale. today, the czech republic was one of the last former soviet satellites where the church has still not received compensation. >> the father believes in god's grace period during his daily prayers, he also praised for the church in the czech republic. as a good christian, he knows one should never abandon hope for a miracle, but as a priest in the czech republic, he has. >> i believe in miracles. our father in heaven can do anything. when i look at the situation in the czech republic and the government, i don't see much of a chance. there is no miracle in sight. >> and merkel is needed soon in order to save the monastery -- a miracle is needed soon in order to save the monastery. the communists expropriated the churches holdings, nationalizing thousands of hectares of forest and land. the church could find itself to releasing that land and pay for much-needed reconstruction work. >> this is a great injustice. how would you feel if someone took something from you and then insulted you when you ask for it back? that is no
socialism loving anti-wealth redistributor who was probably lying about his birth place and his religion. why did we pull our punches? i tell you what. we job creators are not going to take it. we are going golf. just like an ayn rand's "atlas shrugged" and leave you on an island where only you can live, manhattan. now think about this. just think this through, folks. now, "obamacare" is here to stay. ( cheers and applause ) sure, a single illness won't wipe out your life's savings. but at what cost? ( laughter ) a lower one. ( laughter ) and now you have to wait for hours in line for medical scare instead of immediately not getting any. oh and you think you own your house, mister. think again. everything belongs to the village now. when you get home tonight, it will be converted into a lesbian food co-op. and guess what, it's your turn to pack the turnips, and i don't mean starchy tubers. there is a smattering of obama supporters here tonight, right? ( crowd cheering ) no, go ahead, enjoy yourselves. because folks, you bought it. you bought the lie, hook, line and sinker. america's a qu
religion in the u.s. the national religion in the u.s. is the military and the journalists are the high priests. >> what does this mean for afghanistan and the cia? you have this military general becoming the head of the cia, now david petraeus -- the have whatever will happen to john allen. what does this mean? >> i'm not sure means anything as far as the policy national security state. i think it will simply be replaced. i'm not sure that general allen is going anywhere. certainly, david petraeus was an important person in the sense he was a revered, almost as a religious figure, that he shielded the cia and other military institutions from any kind of criticism i think -- >> and has been pushing for an expansion of the drone war. >> and president obama, the commander in chief, his boss, is very much on board with the expansion not just of the drone war, the conversion of the cia and to even more of a paramilitary organization than it has ever been before. i think that will continue fully apace on whoever steps and will be fully on board with that. >> can you say a little bit about th
. i do not think that is religion specific. i think it is across the board. his relationship with israel, the muslim world. host: this is a financial times editorial today. general petraeus has been the mastermind behind using drugs to go after al qaeda in the horn of africa. but has been the world reaction to this kind of military strategy? guest: it's a controversial strategy, no question. the administration has doubled down on the use of drones. there are significantly more than a river were then in the bush administration. there is clearly rationale for some of this, but there are some issues about executive privilege in making some of these decisions. i do not think petraeus is the only person who has been a mastermind. there are many who feel strongly about this. i do not see policy changing, but there's certainly a feeling in pakistan, the horn of africa, and other places. in yemen, it was the morning after obama's victory that there was a draw on strike in yemen -- drone strike. you can call them a surgical strikes, but there are certainly casualties. it's a conversat
with our long history and pluralization of american religions. >> so tell us a bit about that history. why is it okay to joke about jesus but not other religious figures? >> the sacred is much more in contest here in part because of our legacy of religious freedom, but in part because we've had a long history of conflict over sacred imagery and words, often violent conflict. and in more recent years because of the rise of secularism, because of the rise of the culture of mockery in part, as well. it's just become more acceptable. >> is it because more and more of us are agnostic? i mean, why is it? is it -- do we still believe in jesus yet we joke about him? is it the other way around? >> well, it's funny if you read the comments on our cnn belief blog, you'll see that people are engaging in arguments with each other saying our argument has but humor is the way we deal with these kinds of conflicts. and as we say in the piece, in part, it's our way we don't kill each other. >> well, interestingly, i was talking to one of the employees here at cnn, kathy, and she said her minister, she belo
allowing a situation to deter youruate further and further a religion bore that will create more and more hatred and inability of the country to come together again? i am worried that we are not capable. we seem to be not capable at this moment to use the kind of zip sei -- diplomacy i think would be highly desirable top find buy to bring russia to work out a deal with us to find solution to go forward instead of saying no, no, no, and no again. so i think -- i just want to make the point that paula also made as wonderful as, you know, the modern tools are, the world will not allow us to get away with just tools. we will need to confront these situations, and i think the moment is here where it is overdue, it is extremely urgent to try to find a way that will end the killing in syria not only because it has canings for israel and other countries in indonesia, but because it sits, of course, a terrible negative example to others bad guys in this region and elsewhere who will be encouraged if they can get away with these types of behavior if we don't act. so i think this is a huge challenge
, from new york. >> good to have you. >> caller: i've been hearing so much about true religion. where do you think they're headed? >> it's happening. you have to be on the next one. that is for real. i'm looking for the next takeover play. but only one that has good fundamentals? how about charlie in washington state? charlie? [ busy tone ] >> wow, charlie sounds like one of those eagles plays i made yesterday. yeah, it was my fault. the fiscal cliff is overshadowing good investment opportunities. we have to keep the pressure on. and then we can go back to saving for our kids and retirement. "mad money" will be right back. >> coming up, penny for your thoughts? jcpenney is on the retail hot seat while wall street speculated on its future with former apple executive ron johnson at the helm. but while one retailer struggles, cramer may have found one that's cleaning up. the big reveal is ahead. and later, red rising? con concerns over a slowdown in china hampered markets here at home. there are signs that could be changing. tonight, cramer is sifting through the facts to find the tough way
discussion of the impact of very strongly developing fundamental movements in the world religions, particularly monotheistic religions, impacting outcomes of democratic elections as well as perhaps creating a certain amount of instability in terms of governance models that we face. i would be very interested in the panel's assessment of the impact of fundamentalist religious movements, particularly in the context of what is going to be a new normal. >> let's get one more in here. >> i think what is so interesting about this discussion is the baseline question, just putting the question of the new normal in the context of america and american power and leadership. how powerful did america look in 1979 up to vietnam? not very. how powerful did america look in 1989, 10 years later? extremely powerful. 1999, in vincible. 2009-now? well, we have settled down, but we do not really know what we have settled down into. i think it is a baseline question, and i think we forget how quickly the perception of the strings -- strength of american leadership can be. what i think is the question a
fundamental movements and various world religions, particularly monotheistic religions. impacting outcomes of democratic elections as well as, perhaps, creating certain amount of instability in terms of governance models that we face. i would be very interested in the panel's assessment. the impact of a fundamentalist religious movements in and particularly in the context of what is going to be in a normal. >> let's get one more in here. >> get a my cure. you can just use this. >> i want to check with you. >> speak louder. >> can you hear me? okay. here. >> that would have been too much. so interesting about this discussion, raised by all three participants, if you like the baseline question, and just putting the question of the new normal in the context of america to my american power in, a decade basis, and i was jotting down how powerful america looks in 1979 after vietnam, that are on hostage crisis, not very. how powerful in 1989? just ten years later to major in the powerful. how about 1999? select essentially invisible @booktv vincible. 2009. well, we settle down, but we don't reall
for help. our religion correspondent, lauren green, is live with this story. >> hi, jenna. as you said,ouses of worship are supposed to be sanctuaries for the broken hearted, but countless are in great need of healing themselves. the repair work as begun at all saints in bayhead, new jersey, but the road ahead is wrong. the historic structure was built in the late 1800s and designed by boat builders but was never meant to withstand the surge from dirty bay water that sandy brought. >> if it had been just the ocean water, it would have been a lot cleaner, but because it was the bay water and the ditch, it threw the mud in as well and caused more damage than if it had been just purely clean sea water. >> reporter: now, sandy was an equal opportunity destroyer. at western synagogue in queens, new york, the rabbi surveys the damage. the storm put the entire neighborhood and temple under at least four feet of water. the once-pristine sanctuary now has buckling floors, the holy books are unusable, but because of their religious content they cannot be burned, so they sit covered outdoors awai
, not to judge people by their religion, skin color, financial status or anything like that, but accept them for who they are because i have to tell you i am guilty of having what i said call small town complex. using your world is only this big because that is how you were taught. i am 24 and that is not the case. we always do that. we are so fast to judge one another without getting to know one another. i definitely think it is something we could listen to. in northeastern afghanistan, right on the back -- pakistan border, this is who i would be stationed with. lt. johnson and dr. lee in. stock way was that navy corpsman but as anybody knows anything about navy corpsman they might as well the marines. i will call him a marine from here on out. [applause] >> part of my opportunity was getting to meet these guys and develop the team because this was a group of guys i call my brothers. when the team was put together the brass picks different skill sets, ranks, throw them in a team, they don't ask about personality or anything like that. they just put you in and expect him to get along. when i
think that people have a right to not practice religion here. they have a right to do things the way they feel comfortable doing it, which is called secular or religious thinking. they have the right in this country not to follow religious law. for him to feel that he needed to resign over a scandal, i do not think that is proper when he does not have to follow religious thinking about sex in this country. host: thank you for the call this morning. here is the editorial from "usa today." host: diane, want to get your thoughts this morning on the democratic line. caller: i went to school with one of my friends in coronado, california. wondering if you are related to anyone from connecticut. host: not sure. what are your thoughts about the general's resignation? caller: let me tell you something, we came here when i was a, we came to a military base. my stepfather served in the first marines. also we went to camp pendleton and he was the commander of that unit for many years. at the veterans day to our veterans. living and deceased. and active, i should say. about the general, were we
a weird thing as a muslim to have my religion used as a way to delegitimatize the president. you know? yeah, this play sort of deals with a lot of that stuff. it's a very brave, provocative piece of theater, and i was very excited about it. >> why did you take on this role, because it is so different than what you normally do? >> well, i'm an actor, so i have been doing dramatic stuff and comedic stuff my whole career. ever since i played that pixie in the school play. thank god people know about that now. >> roll the tape. where is that? >> there probably is somewhere. i've been doing both my whole career, so, know, the last six or seven years i have been on "the daily show" and people know me as that guy, that comedian guy, but for me to go do dramatic stuff is not that much of a stretch. i have been doing it a lot. >> when you saw how the election turned out and we have heard from mitt romney very recently saying that, look, he thought the reason obama won says was because he thought there were gifts he was giving out to african-americans, to latino, to young people. >> cars and th
their television show. he's very interested in religion, he's very interested in faith, and even though he did not remain a mormon for his entire life -- it was just as a child, he returned to the catholic church -- it will always be a part of this sort of complex faith journey, as he calls it. religion's complicated, and his religious story is complicated too. not because of just catholicism and mormonism, but also because he had joined a protestant/evangelical church that his wife and her family participated in. so he's dabbled with a lot of religious practices. >> host: does he attend church today, and if so, where? >> guest: he says that when he's in washington, he attends catholic mass every single day when he can. >> host: do you know which? ing the yeah, there's a catholic church just a few steps away from his office on capitol hill. it's very easy to get to for him. but when he's here in miami, he lives in west miami, a suburb of miami proper. he attends another church called christ fellowship, and that is an evangelical/protestant-based faith which is a part of the southern baptist co
see political risk to things like fracking coming down? do politicians get religion here? >> i think they already have. certainly if politicians haven't, voters have. we need to look at the results in new york state in some of the local state elections where anti-fracking candidates were defeated very resoundingly. in areas where natural gas and associated gas liquids and even oil can be extracted through the fracking process, more and more you're going to see residents, homeowners, property owners speaking their mind saying this is a resource we want to see exploited not only for ourselves but for the nation and for our own energy independence. >> if this report comes true, does that mean that nat gas prices are destined to remain historically low? >> yes and no. natural gas until we get a sufficient pipeline infrastructure built out to handle some of the swings that we see in certain pockets and i think particularly in the northeast, you know, you're still going to see temporary price spikes. your thesis is correct and your question is correct in that longer term we have sufficient
can behe voter who moved into the democratic, but looking at the number of factors, religion, consumer purchases. how did we get them to be a democrat? continuing use of the social media. we still cannot long-term affects of that. one thing that tickels me is -- tickles me is the style of obama. in two weeks somebody knocked and said you are new. the polling place is here, we hope you vote democratic. they knew every new person in the neighborhood. nate silver's predictions, a new ball game in terms of how we predict, how accurate the prediction may be. his work phenomenally so this time >> 50 for 50 on this day call. >> most expensive super pacs, the role of money. are we really going to continue letting that happen? it is amazing. my review of -- my view of record early voting, a nother change from the pastorate in may be very helpful in the state's likely to have bad weather. my take on the house divided statement was i cannot think it is democrat versus republican. i think the republicans have factored the party and they have to figure out who they are the tea party years -- partie
and really not about race or religion. and that is a difficult concept for some others as they look at our society, net and don't necessarily fully understand it. >> i'm a sponsor with northrop-grumman. i am curious because i lived in syria, to go back to syria, when there is a lot of discussion about things breaking down into sectarianism, i don't see any mention of the fact that syria has probably the largest christian population in the middle middle east, something like 20 to 30%. [inaudible] >> my figures are dated. anyway i am curious, if you would comment on the role of the christian community in syria and how you see that playing out? thank you. >> john -- jen'nan. >> we aren't hearing a lot about the difference between the muslims and christians because it's not an overarching and pressing problem in syria and getting back to comment earlier about the rest of the region, my half brother who was with the libyan rebels against gadhafi, they are now all trying to help the turks get assad out so getting back to marc's comment, we have gone a long way to at least getting some of the res
and concord, to promote the knowledge and practice of true religion and virtue and the increase of science among them and us and generally to grant unto mankind such a degree of temporal prosperity as he alone knows to be best. george washington's official thanksgiving proclamation, october 14, in the year of our lord, 1789. and here before or as we finish and recess for thanksgiving, the visual day this year proclaimed by this year's president, president barack obama, i am, mr. speaker, profoundly grateful as all these presidents i've mentioned, thankful to god for my blessings. i know they're not earned. there was nothing i ever did in the womb to deserve to be born in the greatest country in the history, but i was blessed because generations before were blessed and it's an honor to rise up and call them blessed for the opportunities that were given us through their devotion and thanksgiving and hard work and acknowledgment to god for our blessings. mr. speaker, i was blessed with an older sister, whom i love. i'm blessed with two younger brothers, one who died couple years ago, and for
of health. their religion even disclose. it reminds me a lot of the diagram of the head with a million sperm around it. anyway, it's like the dolphins, to be honest. anyway, the other thing that you learn watching these games is a lot of parents can be idiots. and so what got us going on this idea of this book a mother and a text, you have a guy covering a little girls soccer game and then another guy who's a parent who objected to a call the referee had made. they get into an argument. the kids don't care, but the parents cared deeply. they don't ever want to see each other again. they don't like each other. they keep running into each other during the course of that afternoon fate conspires to bring them together over and over again. within about 12 hours of their first meeting they have a series of events that are perfectly plausible, accidentally hijacked a clothing optional cruise ship, as so often happens in youth soccer. not an entirely realistic plot. the way we rode it was allen would write a chapter in send it to me and i would write a chapter in quickly instead of working toward s
in the discipline commission. it will be in charge of ethnicity and religion. ec more emphasis, they belong to the united front. the least four members of the communist youth league start their career. as i mentioned, half. and also for 30 years in the fleet, the secretary hires up. this is before the party conquest, talking about the military commission. seven of them retired, but the opposition has a difference. it is not as people predicted. these other members, all seven have two or three steps of promotion. they were promoted through the vice chairman. he will likely become the minister of defence. and these are the other important positions in the military. there are other new members, 10 military members, seven of which are new. like the composition, it will not be announced, there are still some changes. most of the rumors have different versions. the vice premier in charge of agriculture, as well as the other one replacing liu yandong. and the wang huning state councilor, there are rumors that he will take [indiscernible] military, d.o.d., state councilor, and chief of staff. it wi
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)